Parallels and Parallelism (Weekly Wrap-Up!)

Sayonara Last Week and A Big  Welcome to the Week to Come!

This week was a little more calm than previous weeks.  Our classes generally consisted of discussions about the reading and some rhetoric work, and the homework was reading from the book and some other materials.  One reading I enjoyed was a sermon by John Winthrop that showed us, not only a glimpse at how the people of that time thought, but also illustrated how they use an almost identical method of writing as is common in essays today.  There was a short introduction before it that was helpful in understanding the passage too.  We should be discussing it sometime next week, but I have a feeling that discussions about the reading will trump it.

One of the big topics of this week is Parallels and Parallelism.  Parallels in structure can be found all the time, for example:

I ate my dinner, washed my face, and brushed my teeth.

Here the parallels in the structure would be pattern of a past tense verb, the possessive pronoun adjective (in this case ‘my’) and a direct object.  This type of parallels is not too difficult to understand after a while, but what I’m still a little bit confused about is parallelism in the imagery of a book, for example, the rose bush on page 46 and Hester’s story being described as a blossom a little later in that page.

Also, this weekend we will be finishing the novel! I can’t wait to see what the grand finale has in store for us, and with the way the rest of the book is written and how Hawthorne carefully and artistically places each and every word, I have a feeling that it will be a masterpiece.

-Paulie 🙂

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